Bold Vision, Bold Behavior: A Success Formula for Selling Martial Arts Memberships

Words "Think Outside the Box" written on top of box drawn on chalkboard

You offer your students a bold vision of possibilities in both physical empowerment and inner strength. You teach students to boldly try new best practices. On the mat, you subscribe to the formula: bold vision through bold behavior.

Do you bring the same approach to your business development—identifying prospective students and enrolling them in your program? Or do you switch to “social selling,” which means observing social niceties versus building your business?

One way to know: Look at the results. Are you having any of these problems?

a) Not enough leads

b) Not enough leads converting to intros

c) Student attrition

Let’s discuss how you can solve these problems through bold vision and bold behavior.

Consider the student attrition problem. Could students be leaving because parent’s expectations are met or exceeded? For example, let’s discuss a case history in student retention:

The problem: A child is isolated at the bus stop and won’t interact with other kids. Your martial arts school builds confidence. In 3 to 4 months, the parent withdraws the child. Mission accomplished. But is it?

If parents see the mission is accomplished, there is no sense of urgency to continue.

What is urgency? For parents, it’s a compelling reason to act now, to keep the child in your classes. What bold vision do you offer parents?

Do you teach parents there are “levels of martial arts consciousness,” which can include:

a) The Martial Arts Mindset

b) Empowerment

c) Leadership

d) Personal Responsibility

e) Inner Strength

f) Technique vs. Power

Do you tell them (in advance) about the journey? If they leave, whose responsibility is this?

Perhaps this is an approach you can use to increase student retention; you might create a brochure to help parents visualize the journey.

Let’s consider lead generating next. Do you have enough leads? What bold vision are you using to generate leads for your Martial Arts school?

Here’s a thought: You may just use a brochure created for student retention (mentioned above) to generate leads. Mail them out and drop them off at places where parents can take one. More importantly: Your best lead source is happy parents. They are a prime selling asset. Are you maximizing this asset through getting:

1) Testimonial letters from satisfied parents?

2) Having them recommend you through social media, e.g. post a message on Facebook about your martial arts school?

Let’s say you have set an objective of 4 intros per month. It’s the second week of the month and you have one intro. Should you be concerned? After all, there are almost two-and-a-half weeks left to the month.

On a do-or-die basis, you want to stay on target of one intro a week. This calls for bold behavior―enrolling satisfied parents to be our advocates, to extend our good reputation. If the month is over, and we only have one intro, it’s too late to affect the results. We need to act now, on a “do-or-die” basis to hit our results.

Finally, let’s consider the conversion of phone call inquiries to intros.

Let’s spend a moment on examining the incoming phone call:

Social Seller

Customer: Hi, could I get some literature.

Martial Arts School: Sure, why don’t you come down for a demo.

Customer: First, let me see the literature, then maybe I’ll come down.

Martial Arts School: Sure, look forward to hearing from you.

Business Seller

Customer: Hi, could I get some literature?

Martial Arts School: Sure, glad to. Tell me, why are you calling us today?

Customer: I’m thinking of having my child take martial arts lessons.

Martial Arts School: Great! Any particular skill or character quality you want your child to develop?

Customer: He’s kinda shy at the bus stop.

In the second case, we used some boldness to learn the urgent need, and move from social selling to business selling. By focusing on the urgent need, we can increase our conversion to intros. Once they visit, we can give parents the brochure we designed with student retention in mind.

By bringing the bold vision and bold behavior that you employ on the mat to your business development, you can ensure a growing, profitable martial arts business.

About the author: membersolutions has taught selling skills for 17 years. He started three businesses and has made approximately 4,000 sales calls, selling both B2B and B2C. He invented a selling process, Urgency Based Selling®, with which he can typically help companies double their closing or conversion ratio.

10 Ways to Reduce Your Delinquency Rate & Increase Cash Flow

Business charts and graphs

In the 26 years that Member Solutions has been in business, we’ve discovered that there are ways to alter member payment behaviors to ensure prompt and predictable cash flow to your facility. Here are 10 tips to reduce your delinquencies and facilitate collections with our managed billing services.

1. Avoid statement or coupon billing methods whenever possible.

Customers that pay by statement or coupon are 23% more likely to become delinquent than those who sign up for auto-pay. Enroll customers for bank draft or a credit card option. It’s a double-win for you: Customers are more likely to pay on time and electronic payment options save you money.

2. Get email addresses from every customer.

Email is one of the fastest ways to communicate with your customers. It has become an effective tool in delinquency management. When we send email reminders as part of our payment collections service, we provide a direct link to our customer-only website where your members can make payments and update their billing information.

3. Provide a contract copy promptly when requested.

Your agreement is legal proof of the customer’s obligation to pay. The quicker we receive the agreement, the better chance we have in recovering your funds.

4. Select due dates early in the month.

If a customer does miss a payment, has a declined payment, or a returned payment, Member Solutions has a better chance to recover your funds within the same billing cycle when payments are due when a new month starts. We recommend setting the 1st or 5th of the month as the due date for all of your members.

5. Know who’s delinquent.

Our most successful clients know how and where to find this information online. Here are ways to stay informed:

  • Review the delinquency report at least twice per month.
  • Sign up for Email Alerts. We’ll email you and any staff member you designate whenever a customer has a returned or declined payment.
  • Examine the Activity Report on a weekly basis. Not only will it provide you with a list of new accounts and funding activity, but it also will list any customers with an active follow-up that is preventing or delaying billing.

Member Solutions Managed Billing Solution - Software on Monitor

6. Work together with Member Solutions.

The clients we see with the lowest delinquency percentages work with our team to make it easy for members to manage their accounts and make payments. Some clients prefer to be direct with their members, while others prefer a subtle approach. Either method will increase collection results, so long as you’ve communicated your preferences to our team.

Once you know who is past due, you can simply hand your customer a Member Solutions’ business card and say, “Member Solutions has informed us that they have been unable to contact you. Here’s a card with their website and contact information.”

Once a customer is aware that you may know that they have a billing issue, they are more likely to pay on time to avoid embarrassment.

7. Ask your customer to provide you with their most accurate billing information.

Have them provide it to you directly rather than obtaining it from a driver’s license or previous billing account which may be outdated. Ask the customer to verify their vital billing information when they are signing the agreement.

8. Make sure that your customer knows that Member Solutions is servicing the billing portion of their agreement to avoid having payments charged back.

Your endorsement of Member Solutions provides your customers with the reassurance of your professionalism and commitment to quality service. Place the Member Solutions decal in your business and hand out contact cards, both provided free of charge. Talk about our customer portal, designed specifically for your customers to make payments, update their billing information, print payment history, or contact our customer service team.

9. Offer settlements to members who have trouble paying.

The longer an account remains delinquent, the less likely you are to receive payment. When a customer is no longer attending class or using your facility, they are more likely to stop paying altogether.

Once an account reaches 90 days delinquent, we recommend automatically offering the customer a settlement for a percentage of the remaining balance. This could bring you income in the form of a lump sum payment and leave the customer on better terms which could result in new customer referrals or re-enrollment in the future.

10. Don’t accept payments at your business.

Generally, we discourage our clients from accepting payments at your place of business. Accepting payments creates more work for you and increases the likelihood that your customer will receive delinquency phone calls and correspondence when they are not past due.

Worse yet, it also increases the chance of double billing your customer when the payment is not reported immediately to Member Solutions. Finally, once you accept that first payment, chances are it will occur again and diminish our authority when the customer decides not to pay.

How to Respond to Membership Contract Complaints

membership contract signature with pen on paper

A written billing agreement―otherwise known as a membership contract—is a standard business document used by many membership-based businesses. Every day, martial arts schools, fitness clubs, yoga and Pilates studios, and MMA gyms establish agreements with their members. The membership business offers classes, lessons, equipment, and/or training in exchange for payment from the member. Through the membership contract, the member agrees to use services provided by the business and pay for them at an agreed price under certain terms and conditions.

Sounds clear-cut, right? Unfortunately, issues surrounding membership contracts arise, and those issues can be anything but clear-cut. Members often oppose the terms of the signed billing agreement, stating, “That is not what I was told when I joined.” Membership contract complaints turn into a ‘contract dispute’ and can then escalate to a formal consumer complaint filed with the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and/or the State Attorney General.

Formal complaints issued through the BBB and/or State Attorney General aren’t to be taken lightly. Here are 6 tips you should consider before responding to these complaints:

  1. Make sure you fully understand the membership contract complaint before you respond. Angry customers tend to throw everything they can into a formal complaint in order to prove their case. Before you formulate your response, find the customer’s proposed resolution. Once you know of the requested resolution, you can better address the complaint.
  2. Keep your personal feelings out of it. Your anger or disappointment has no place in a formal response letter. Many local BBBs post responses online for others to review. State the facts only.
  3. Back up your responses with documentation, e.g. a written billing agreement or cancellation form. Be sure to black out any bank account or credit card numbers if they are included in your documentation.
  4. Keep copies of the complaint and your responses. If the issue is not resolved with the first correspondence, you may receive a rebuttal complaint. Having a copy of the first letter helps in responding to the second letter.
  5. If you do not agree with the customer’s suggested resolution, offer an alternative. This displays your willingness to compromise and end the dispute on amicable terms.
  6. Whether the consumer complaint is filed with the BBB or the State Attorney General, it is very important to respond by the suggested deadline date. This is especially true of Attorney General complaints. The Attorney General has the power to investigate further and can prosecute if it finds wrong-doing. Your best bet with Attorney General disputes is to find a way to resolve them as quickly as possible.

As I’ve mentioned before, your ability to resolve the membership conflict complaints is an extremely important part of keeping your business successful and your business reputation protected. Often times it is best to find a resolution that works for both parties.

For additional guidance, read my post on how to properly handle member cancellations.

About the author: Margo Stauffer has extensive experience in managing customer service teams in several industries, including eight years in the health and fitness area serving franchisees throughout the world.

Maximizing the Benefits of Term & Ongoing Memberships

Client Question: What Term membership length is best? What cancel notice period is optimal for ongoing memberships? Which one should I use?

I am often asked these questions about Term and Ongoing memberships so I’ll share with you my recommendation for your review and consideration. Please keep in mind a few of these upfront points:

1. Each facility is different and there are multiple good answers to provide.

2. Laws vary from state to state and country to country, so always check with your legal advisor if you have any restrictions to consider.

3. If selling isn’t a strong asset for you and your team, I recommend Ongoing memberships as an easy way to get new members on board initially.

4. Price is critical too because this determines your revenue. You need to price your memberships factoring level of commitment. Too often I hear about owners giving substantial discounts for low obligation memberships to entice buyers: this hurts the bottom line. If delinquencies and dropouts rise, your cost of business can wipe out profits faster than a Bruce Lee block and counter move. Check out a great article posted by Dina Engel, our COO, for more info on delinquency management: 10 Ways to Reduce Your Delinquency Rate & Increase Cash Flow

Ok, finally, my personal opinion …

I believe that new members and existing members should be managed differently, since they have two different frames of reference. Existing members should be willing to commit more than a new member, if I am providing great service and they are experiencing success (obtaining benefits). With this distinction, I would set up the following:

New Members: I would offer new members two ongoing membership options:

The first can be cancelled at any time with 30 days advance notice. This membership would be priced very high. The purpose of this membership is to establish the value of the program. I am not looking for many takers here because the notice period is still too short for my comfort level given that summer is 2.5 months long. But if a member is looking for ultimate flexibility, I am willing to accept the higher price point in exchange.

The second can be cancelled at any time with 90 days advance notice and I would price it at 25-35% off the 30 day notice program. It’s important that this price point not be inexpensive compared to your competitors. It should be what you actually want for monthly tuition per member. This program still offers the member a low pressure enrollment and a cost savings to justify the extra 3 payments should they terminate the membership. I like it because it gives me and my staff enough time to overcome any challenges that are causing termination and perhaps we can repair it.

Existing Members: I would offer a Term membership:

What I like most about Ongoing memberships is that they don’t expire, giving me the freedom to choose when to renew or upgrade a member. The best time to do this is after a belt exam. Once the member has been training for 3 to 6 months, they should have a more educated view of Martial Arts training and the benefits they are absorbing. This should lead to increased value for Martial Arts training and create an easier upsell to a bigger and better membership option with more commitment. Many people refer to these “Advance Training Programs” as Black Belt Club, Leadership teams, Master Black Belt Club, etc.

These Term memberships can vary in length up four years. Personally I like a full one year commitment with an auto renew option with a 60 or 90 day cancel notice. In this way, I acquire a sense of commitment from the member while also eliminating expired programs which save me from renewal work.

Your membership strategy is a critical aspect of your business that impacts your bottom line in many ways. There are many solutions that can work and sometimes you need a trial and error strategy.

Joe Galea is the President of Member Solutions. Galea, one of Member Solutions’ founders, has been counseling school owners for over 20 years, and spends part of everyday speaking with clients and industry leaders.

Share with us! Let us know what membership structure works for your business. Comment below.

8 Keys to Effective Business Partnerships

Partnering is a critical element of nearly all businesses. We partner with employees and investors, in addition to actual business partners or co-owners. Effective partnering is evident in any successful organization that requires multiple human beings to achieve its objectives.

Teams of all types require a few elements of effective partnering to be successful. Marriage and personal relationships require a focus on partnering and attention to these same elements.

The topic has been researched and published extensively in both the academic and popular press. Two titles that I really enjoy and lean on are Lencioni’s “Five Dysfunctions of Team” and Wagner/Muller’s “The Power of 2.” These and other writings focus on several critical elements of successful partnerships.

As you review the following list, reflect on your current business partnerships and employee relationships.


1) Commitment to a Common Mission – Successful organizations rally around a common, clearly articulated goal and vision. Team members must understand, believe and live it. This must be more than just lip service. When people say they are committed, but then take actions or make comments privately that conflict or undermine the mission, it is incredibly damaging.

2) Unselfishness – The power of cooperation is well known to all of us. Two plus two can certainly equal well more than four when true cooperation exists. Of course, the opposite is even more truthful. One self-interested member of a partnership or team will poison the group and generate lingering animosity that will pervade the team and limit success, at best.

3) Complimentary Capabilities – A football team’s offense could not function with two centers trying to hike the ball and also would not work without blocking, running, receiving and quarterback play. A partnership is no different. Do not go into business with someone that has your same capabilities and weaknesses. Partners must seriously consider the individual skills, talents, and limitations of each and then deploy each partner in a disciplined way that ensures all contribute their capabilities to the team. Trying to create a role or accept sub par performance from a partner because you want them as a partner will lead to failure.

4) Ongoing Communication – Open, honest and frequent communication is an absolute requirement for success. Without it, team members can end up in silos, mired in the details of their function, rather than staying focused on contributing to the broader objectives.

5) Acceptance of Differences – Put a few humans together, and you will likely find something in each of them that can annoy another on some level. People have different quirks and habits that need to be accepted and forgiven as long as they do not deter the team from its mission. Effective partners accept human quirks and differences for the better of the organization.

6) Forgiveness – We all make mistakes. If we don’t we are not trying hard enough. We enjoy skiing in my family, and I often say to my kids: “If you are not falling, you are not trying hard enough.” We must forgive our partners and ourselves and create an organizational culture that encourages risk-taking and new ideas by openly forgiving when they don’t work out.

7) Fairness – When people are treated fairly, they remain motivated and will often achieve beyond expectations. The opposite will result in demotivation, animosity, and lack of commitment. The compelling need to ensure that one’s own personal situation is fair will be present in discussions, decisions, and serve a significant distraction to the individual, thereby severely limiting the potential of the partnership.

8) Trust – Business partnerships require trust that is built upon mutual respect, honesty, and demonstrated integrity. Without this, all is lost.

I have been very fortunate and am incredibly thankful to have great partners at Member Solutions. Together, we have enjoyed strong business growth and been fortunate to also develop deep family friendships. We have grown professionally, personally, and financially by working hard to remain focused on these critical partnership success drivers. It is not always easy, and we often have to remind ourselves to be disciplined and work hard on these core principles and the values that are behind them.

All the work and time is well worth it and offers rewards beyond business success.


About the author: Steve Pinado is CEO of Member Solutions, a leading provider of solutions to martial arts businesses. Before finding a home at Member Solutions, Steve held executive roles at several Fortune 500 companies after earning his MBA at Dartmouth. He can be reached at spinado@membersolutions.com or by phone at 888.277.4409.

Take Charge(back): How to Handle Payment Disputes

Chargebacks Guy Calling Bank to Dispute Charges

“What do you mean they’re disputing the charge? They signed a contract!”

Chances are you’ve been in this circumstance before. One of your customers has contacted their bank to dispute a charge. It can seem like an invasion on your bank account, causing unneeded work and aggravation on your part to settle the situation. Fortunately, there are ways to minimize payment disputes. Let’s talk about payment disputes, why we get them, and how to prevent them.

Why Do Chargebacks Occur?

A chargeback occurs when a cardholder contacts their credit card-issuing bank and asks for a refund on a transaction for a purchase or service made on their card. There are a variety of reasons a customer will charge back a payment. Here are the most common:

  • The customer doesn’t recognize the charge
  • The customer claims that they cancelled services
  • The customer didn’t receive a credit
  • The customer claims fraudulent charges (stolen card)
  • The customer is unhappy with the service or purchase

It’s important to note that consumers have the right to charge back payment when they believe there has been fraud or a product has not been delivered as specified. The Fair Credit Billing Act defines the rules for credit card fraud and billing disputes here in the US. However, disliking a product or being unhappy with the merchant or product does not give the customer the right to charge back a payment through the bank.

Chargebacks are a great tool in the consumers’ hand. As a merchant, we give this power to the consumer when we don’t clearly state the return policy, cancellation policy, or identify ourselves to the customer—which brings us to some tips to prevent chargebacks.

Tips to Prevent Chargebacks from Happening in the First Place

Protecting yourself from chargebacks can be tricky. However, the best defense is the best offense. Put these best practices in place to prevent chargebacks from occurring:

  • Provide the customer with the name and phone number of your company so that they recognize your charge. This is the first reason you may receive a chargeback.
  • Have your return/cancellation policy clearly stated on the contract and on your website.
  • Provide accurate descriptions of your services.
  • Get authorization for your charges with a valid signature.
  • Keep your contracts and agreements updated.
  • Credit cards should always be valid. When possible, get a signature when customers update their cards.
  • Get a signed proof of delivery for products.
  • Talk to your customers to resolve issues before they talk to the bank. That personal touch can go a long way in dealing with and preventing chargebacks.

So You Received a Payment Dispute. Now What?

Chargebacks are unfortunately something every small business owner faces at one time or another. So let’s look at what to do when you receive one.

The lifecycle of a chargeback can start two different ways.

Retrieval

In the event that you receive an inquiry/dispute or “retrieval,” you still have a chance to avoid the chargeback. Disputes are most likely from a customer not recognizing the transaction on their credit card statement. In an ideal world, customers call the number that is associated with the transaction to determine the merchant, but in many cases, this does not happen.

Dispute

If you receive an inquiry, retrieval or dispute, immediately respond with a signed contract or agreement confirming the charge. In most dispute cases, the transaction is confirmed, the bank is satisfied, and no further action is needed.

Managed Billing Services by Member Solutions

How Does Your Billing Company Handle Chargebacks?

If you’re a Member Solutions billing client, we handle the chargebacks for you.

Here’s the process:

When we receive an online request from the credit card company, we look up the customer account to see if we have a contract on file. If we do, it is immediately sent to the credit card company with an explanation of who is billing the customer. If we don’t hear back from the credit card company, it means they accepted our documentation and the case is closed.

On some occasions, credit card companies ask for further documentation or clarification. We contact you, the merchant, if necessary. If these steps are not taken in a timely manner, the dispute will most likely become a chargeback.

If the customer claims the transaction is a fraud or that they canceled the services or product, the bank will issue an immediate chargeback with a chargeback fee of (in most cases) $25.

However, we, at Member Solutions, still respond immediately with an explanation of the charge and a signed authorized contract or agreement showing the valid transaction. It can take up to 45 days before we know if the bank will send a chargeback reversal. A chargeback reversal is when the bank agrees with our documentation and gives back the money.

There are, of course, instances of true fraud. In those cases, that money will be lost. We sometimes receive a chargeback reversal, and in another 45 days, the bank will send a second chargeback. This means the customer and/or bank has decided that the charge is invalid and that decision is final. We must then take the money from the merchant account. At that point, the case is closed.

This, of course, isn’t what any of us want to see happen. Your best action is to be clear with your customers about their contract and services—and keep in constant contact to make sure that the customers are satisfied.

What’s an ACH/EFT Chargeback?

It’s important to know that there is another kind of chargeback: an ACH/EFT chargeback. ACH/EFT stands for Automated Clearing House/Electronic Funds Transfer. Automated Clearing House is an electronic banking network used for direct deposit and electronic bill payment.

In the case of an ACH/EFT chargeback, the consumer notifies their bank that a payment initiated by a merchant is not authorized. In most cases of ACH disputes, Member Solutions receives a request from the bank telling us a customer is disputing their ACH/EFT payment from their checking or savings account.

What Happens When You Receive an ACH/EFT Chargeback?

The merchant has 14 days to respond with a signed contract or agreement stating that this payment is valid. The burden of proof is with the merchant to prove the customer signed an agreement authorizing them to debit the customer’s account.

Again, if you’re billing with Member Solutions, we send the bank a copy of the contract or agreement with the checking account or savings account information with a signature in hopes that the bank is satisfied with the proof we have provided.

In most cases, this will save a chargeback. If there is no proof sent in the 14 days, the payment will be charged back. This is just another reason for why it is important to establish that relationship with your customer.

Membership Agreement Contract

Make Sure Your Membership Agreements Contain Important Information

Your membership contracts or agreements should show the cardholder’s name, address, and phone number. It also needs clear contract terms and a concise cancellation/refund policy. Be sure you have an authorized cardholder signature—and at a minimum—the last four digits visible of the credit card number that is tied to the disputed charge. These things make a successful attempt at avoiding a chargeback.

As always, we’re here to help. If you would like more information about the chargeback process or have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Member Solutions Client Services at 888.277.4407. We’re happy to assist you.

Good luck and strive to be chargeback free!

About the author: Ursula Carter is the Finance Manager at Member Solutions. Her experience includes an exclusive two-year focus on chargeback management, where she worked with credit card companies and individual merchants to prevent payment disputes and resolve chargebacks. As Finance Manager, Ursula assumes direct responsibility for the day-to-day billing operations, which includes ensuring the correct system functions for all billing-related processes, and working with appropriate personnel to correct system issues, client interaction, payments, and client funding.

How to Handle Membership Cancellations with Ease

"I Agree" checkbox on membership contract Terms & Conditions

20% of calls to the Member Solutions’ call center are about customer cancellation inquiries. It can be the most challenging type of call. A member has stopped attending class, has stopped making payments, and wants out of the membership agreement.

Although you as the business owner are legally correct to enforce the terms of the contract, it doesn’t change the member’s view on what they perceive as “the right thing to do.” Most times, the member does not understand why he/she is being held to terms when he/she voluntarily stopped attending. This situation creates conflict and a disgruntled consumer.

An unhappy consumer will communicate the experience to as many people as possible. With social media and review sites readily accessible, we often see disgruntled consumers post untrue and negative statements. Readers of these posts do not have all the facts, and many times perceive the biased version as the truth.

The good news is that you have the ability to turn a negative experience into a positive by implementing any of the following suggestions into your business policy.

Here are a few ideas to help defuse this situation for your business:

1. Send Member Solutions a hard copy of your signed membership agreement to store.

Many disputes are averted simply by our representative’s ability to immediately present a signed copy of the agreement. The signed document reinforces the terms, including the rights for cancellation. Seeing the terms again in writing is sometimes enough ammunition to diffuse the dispute.

2. Build a cancellation fee in your membership agreement.

Select a dollar amount that may be equal to 30, 60 or 90 days’ notice. Some of our most successful clients use this option.

3. Create a term rate that is more attractive than a month-to-month rate—and include a cancellation fee.

If a customer wants to cancel prior to the end of the term, the cancellation fee equates to the difference between the two choices multiplied by the number of lapsed months in the agreement.

Here’s an example: The month to month rate is $100.00 per month. The term rate is $75 x 12 months. The cost difference is $25.00 per month. If the term customer wants to cancel 6 months into the agreement, the cancellation fee would be $25.00 x 6 months = $150.00.

4. Make sure your cancellation terms are clearly part of the signed agreement.

 
Discussing Contract Membership Cancellation

 5. Offer a settlement when the account becomes 90 days delinquent.

Most Member Solutions clients choose to settle for 50% of the remaining balance. This option saves relationships and provides you with some of the principal balance that you may have not collected otherwise.

Additionally, a contract cancellation opt-out method may assist with your lead-to-membership conversions. Many people, especially in this economy, don’t want to commit to long term agreements and therefore won’t sign a term agreement that doesn’t allow them a method to break it.

Implement these suggestions to effectively handle membership cancellations. Ultimately, ending a business relationship on a positive note will aid member retention and referrals.

What membership cancellation terms have worked for your business? Have a tip to share? Comment below.

Margo Stauffer is the Director of Customer Service for Member Solutions.