Webinar: Why Your Fitness Business Needs a Mobile App

Mobile apps can dramatically increase member retention and revenue for fitness businesses. By strengthening member loyalty, you reduce attrition and differentiate your facility from competitors. Apps provide additional marketing tools to help you promote events and special offers. Integration with your fitness center software enables cardless check-in and mobile schedules.

In this webinar, you’ll get a practical overview of the benefits of having your own mobile app. You’ll learn:

  • How mobile apps increase member retention
  • How to promote your facility and products using mobile technology
  • An affordable way to create and manage your own custom mobile app

Presented by Hugh McEvoy, General Manager at MiGym

Member Solutions partners with MiGym to provide a turnkey solution for gyms and fitness studios who want engage members through their own custom mobile app. Learn more about our MemberAssist mobile app and integrated fitness software.

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4 Ways to Build Solid Customer Relationships in Your Fitness Business

Personal trainer and client smiling while discussing workout scheduling at fitness center

Are you focusing as much energy on your current members as you are with your new ones?

Having engaged, happy customers not only helps make your business more successful, but it also makes your job worth going to every day. When you open your doors on day one, it’s pretty easy to remember the important details of your first clients’ lives; birthdays, family events, career successes. As with any relationship, these are the details that form strong bonds and create customers that will stay with you for a long time.

As your member base grows, it becomes increasingly more difficult to have enough time in the day for those meaningful conversations—it’s not that you don’t want to, but if you spent even just five minutes a day with 200 members, that wouldn’t leave you with time to do much else. It is, of course, still vital to engage your customers. As with so many parts of your business, having systems in place helps to ensure that your customers know how important they are to you should be a key part of your operations.

1) Technology

Most modern technology is geared towards one thing: convenience. In this case, let technology do the work for you. If you have only a few short moments with one of your members, would you rather spend that time collecting an overdue payment or asking them how their weekend was? Assuming you answered the latter, letting your members know that they can make payments online will help you to forego the often times awkward conversation you need to have about their tardy payment.

If you have an event or class for which they need to register, let them know that they can register from the convenience of their home. Don’t make them stand at your front desk signing forms and writing checks when you could be asking them about their goals or soliciting their feedback.

2) Go Above & Beyond

What may seem like a little thing to you may alter the entire scope of somebody else’s day. You never know how an email to one of your customers may brighten their mood. Because it would be nearly impossible to manually send an email to each and every current and former member you’ve ever known, have a system in place to do it for you.

At a minimum, make sure you’re collecting birthday information and setting an email to be automatically sent on the right day. Remember, every email you send doesn’t necessarily have to contain information about upcoming events or sales. Sometimes a simple “Happy Birthday!” will go a lot further for your business.

3) Connect on the Phone

Of course, not everything can be an email or text message. Speaking to your customers directly, even over the phone, can help cement the relationship you’ve built. If you’re worried you may be missing someone, set yourself a reminder. Assign an ongoing task for someone on your staff to do touch base calls. Most importantly, don’t wait until the member hasn’t been there for a while; engagement is proactive, not reactive.

4) Hold Member Appreciation Events

Everyone wants to grow their member base. Holding “Bring a Friend” events is an effective and often times lucrative way to hit that goal. Remember, though, you can’t grow your member base without doing your best to keep the current roster engaged and happy.

Holding member appreciation events can do just that. Host a free event in which your only expense is your time (a special group class) and only invite your current customers. Some may argue that the value gained from these events can even far exceed the cost of an event you pay for out-of-pocket, such as hiring a special speaker or trainer.

Before and after the event, give them the chance to mingle with each other. Take the opportunity to talk to them on a personal level. Cultivate a community within your business. If you host these events regularly, not only will your relationship with your customers improve but your customers’ relationships with each other will improve, too.

As always, Member Solutions is invested in your success. We offer a variety of tools that can help you systemize important aspects of your business so that you can focus on what you do best. If you’d like to learn more about how you can make the most of these tools, don’t hesitate to contact the Training and Support team at 877.600.3811 or support@membersolutions.com to schedule a training session today.

About the author: Justin Bodamer is the Product Support Manager for Member Solutions. The Training & Support team is dedicated to helping you and your team make the most of your software and services. You can contact him at membersolutions@membersolutions.com.

Killer Customer Service: 5 Quick Tips for Your Fitness Business

Two young women hand credit card for membership payment to representative at front desk

Upon entering a sushi or Japanese restaurant, you may be greeted by the chefs with the expression, Irasshaimase, which means Welcome, please come in. It is one of the reasons I love going out for sushi, and I eat a lot of it.

Whether you’re a personal trainer, a fitness club operator, or a yoga studio manager, you want to create that same special feeling when people enter your business’s door or even walk into a class that is being taught.

The policy at our personal training studio is very simple: Every trainer greets everyone. They do not pass a client without saying hello. If the client is leaving, they say goodbye. These greetings and salutations go a long way to making our clients feel at home in our gym, which is exactly the feeling we strive for.

The easiest way to provide killer customer service in your fitness business is to do more for your members.

Here are five quick and simple ways to amp up your customer service:

1. Offer Towel Service—Provide clients with workout towels and shower towels so they do not need to carry around a wet towel all day in their gym bag. If you do not have access to laundry services, you can brand the towels with your business logo and use the towels as promotions by giving them to new clients as a welcome gift. The towels will serve as additional advertising should your clients visit another gym.

2. Provide Online Appointment Scheduling—Your clients deserve quick access to your schedules so they can make changes and book the sessions that they want, when they want them. The great thing with using fitness software like Member Manager is that frees up your time from answering the phone or emailing people back and forth to book appointments. Online scheduling will end appointment errors (no more double-bookings), and keep your clients happy and in charge of their scheduling.

3. Run Internal Events and Contests—Contests and events can be easy to put together and fun for your clients and trainers. Track the number of steps and reward those that hit 10,000 steps a day, or use the elliptical and stair climbers to track against the elevation of mountains like Everest or Fuji. Internal competitions, contests, and events will keep your clients engaged and your trainers focused.

4. Host an Online Store—This is another double-purpose service offering, one that clients love and that you can use to generate more revenue for your fitness business. Sell your memberships, personal training sessions, your fitness gear, and even your events through an online store. Add your affiliate’s websites to this same store to generate even more revenue for your fitness business.

5. Spa-Up Your Bathrooms —Your clients are busy and need to get ready for a day of work or a night out. Provide soaps, shampoos, and accessories to transform your change room into a spa-like space. If you do this right, you can also sell these same products to your members by setting up distributor agreements with suppliers.

When you deliver superior customer service like this, you can use it as a competitive advantage to contend with other fitness gyms and studios, to justify your price points, and to promote additional revenue streams, all while making your existing clients raving fans of your fitness facility.

5 Tips to Selling Memberships during a Recession

Recession graph on computer screen

We have read the headlines and listened to newscasts of the global economic crisis. Consumers are fearful and are not spending their hard-earned dollars as freely as they did in better times.

Traditionally, the health and fitness industry has not been adversely affected by economic downturns. Consumers spend money on necessities and good valued essentials. What can be more important than one’s health?

Listed below are five tips to selling fitness memberships during a recession. See if you can add more, and share this article with your staff.

1) Sell yourself.


The first person that needs to be sold on investing in one’s health, especially during downturns — be it financial, emotional or physical—is you, the membership advisor (I would go as far to say that every employee must feel the same way).

Believing in the value of exercise is not an option. Everyone knows the value of exercise, and now more than ever, must believe that exercise helps one’s physical and mental well-being. This helps overcome the emotional and physical challenges that we currently face and that lie ahead. Once you embrace the fact that living a healthy lifestyle is a 24/7 attitude in good times and in bad, you will close more sales.

2) Sell with passion.


Questions membership advisers must ask themselves are:

1. Are you exercising?
2. Do you believe in the product that you are selling?
3. Do you practice what you preach?

The biggest component to selling anything is emotion. People buy on emotion. They can sense whether the representative is sincere or just putting it on to make the sale. Today’s consumer is very savvy. Do not underestimate their ability to see right through false emotion and excitement. Membership advisors must have a burning passion for fitness and living a healthy lifestyle. That passion must flow through their presentation and engulf their prospect.

2) Ignore the negativity.


Membership advisors should not get caught up reading doomsayer headlines and watching stock market results or chaos around the world. Yes, they must know what is going on, but, should not dwell on it. They should stay away from negative people. Everyone knows who they are. Have them run, not walk, away from them. Being distracted from their daily “success cycle” will only make matters worse.

Membership advisors must keep their PMA (Positive Mental Attitude) in check every day, no matter what is going on around them or in their own personal lives for that matter. They must stay focused.

3) Provide value.


Consumers are evaluating where to spend their hard-earned dollars. Membership advisors must make the value proposition relate to their goals and fitness needs. Showing prospects the value of starting an exercise program, and that starting now, makes more sense than ever. They must explain how spending less than $2 per day for a fitness membership (some may be as little as $0.50 and others as much as $5 per day) is a great value, especially when you determine what their daily spending habits are.

Check out these stats. According to the National Coffee Association, the average yearly coffee consumption per person in the United States is close to 4.4 Kg. Among coffee drinkers, the average coffee consumption in the United States is 3.1 cups of coffee per day. That adds up very quickly when you talk about two to four cups of coffee per day.

You probably don’t know that Americans spent 2 million on cosmetics last year alone and that cutting out cigarettes—whether you light up once or more than a dozen times a day—can save you hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars each year. A pack of cigarettes now costs more than $5 on average— with some states tacking on additional taxes that raise the price even more.

In New York City, local taxes have pushed the cost of a pack to about $10. I can add to this list, but you get the point. Members can join your program for a low fixed cost and enjoy the benefits of living a healthy lifestyle. Prepare your team by having membership advisors list as many cost benefit savings as they can.

4) Empathy versus sympathy.


Empathy is the capacity to recognize or understand another’s state of mind or emotion. It is often characterized as the ability to put oneself into another’s shoes, or to in some way, experience the outlook or emotions of another being within oneself.

Sympathy is a social affinity in which one person stands with another person, closely understanding his or her feelings.

Membership advisers should not sympathize but empathize with prospects. They must understand their situation but not get caught up in their story. Bring the conversation back to results and benefits of joining your program. Turn each negative into a positive.

People on a tight budget usually don’t have much to do other than watch TV, read, and surf the web. That gets boring quickly and only encourages a less than healthy lifestyle. They can be at the gym, exercising, socializing, networking, and making new friends all for a low monthly fixed fee. They can read, surf the web, and watch TV while working out.

Selling memberships is not just giving a “Vanna White Tour,” as my partner and senior vice president, Deana Valente, calls it. Or as my good friend and colleague Casey Conrad calls it, the “Disney Tour,” and asking the all-too-familiar closing statement, “So what do you think?”

Selling is a profession and selling memberships is no different. Remember there is always a sale made during a tour of your facility. The consumer sells you or you sell the consumer. Which do you prefer?

Author: Tony Santomauro

5 Budget-Friendly Ideas for Your Business’s Grand Opening Event

Client Question: I am opening a new business soon. Can you provide some ideas to drive traffic to my business on our grand opening day?


Chances are good that you have invested a lot of money into starting your new business. Here I’ll provide some low-budget ideas for a grand opening celebration.

1) Rent an inflatable jumpy or bouncy to place in front of your business. If you don’t have a front lawn, rent a sky tube. Add balloons, yard signs, and gigantic banners out front that read, Grand Opening—anything that will make people look at your location. Use your connections, too. Know someone that owns a hot rod, race car, or chopper? See if they’ll let you borrow it. Place it out front to draw attention.

2) Offer free hot dogs and sodas throughout your event. Have visitors go inside your martial srts school or gym to get a coupon for the free food. In order to get the coupon, have them fill out an info card.

3) Create grand opening postcards or flyers. Donate $250 to your local high school football, soccer, baseball, or basketball teams. In return, ask them to put the postcards or flyers out in the neighborhood they live in. This is an easy way to get cards out for little to no money. It’s also a win-win for you and your local schools and sports teams. They need money, too, and will appreciate your donation.

4) Have hourly giveaways for gift cards to local restaurants and movie theaters. Have visitors fill out an info card to enter the drawing for the prizes. Make sure you keep their information and enter it in your member management software so you can follow up with them about joining your martial arts school or gym.

5) Giveaway t-shirts with your business name and logo. Drive around to local businesses, parks, and supermarkets. Invite the people you talk to take a class. Have an appointment book on hand. Make sure they know about the Grand Opening celebration.

Remember that your grand opening doesn’t have to be just a one-day or evening event. Make the most of your new business opening. Consider running a one- or two-week celebration to keep the excitement and the momentum going.

Hope this helps,

Chuck


About the author: Chuck Heacock is the owner of the Fitness Compound, a training facility that provides unparalleled fitness activities including Martial Arts classes, special boot camps, personal training, baseball, basketball, spinning, Zumba, cardio, and more. Chuck is also a sought-after fitness industry consultant.

Doing the Math to Calculate Martial Arts Business Success

Why do some martial arts studios have 50 students while others have 500?

Before delving into the multitude of factors contributing to business success or failure, understand first that it all comes down to two very simple metrics: Number of monthly enrollments and drop-out rate. As long as your number of enrollments is greater than the number of drop-outs, your school population will continue to climb.

Let’s take it a step further.

You enroll a certain number of students every month. Let’s say 10, for example. You also lose a certain percentage of your current student population each month, perhaps 10 percent.

When you first start a school, you gain students but lose very few. If you have 10 students and you lose 10 percent, you lose only one student. Your net gain is nine students. However, if you have 100 students, you will lose 10 each month. At this point, your enrollments equal your drop-outs, and you will stay at about 100 students.

When your school is growing, eventually the number of students you gain will equal the number of students you lose, and you reach a point of equilibrium where your student population will remain steady.

A Formula to Calculate Martial Arts Business Success

There is a very simple formula to calculate exactly how many students you can have based on your key business factors:

n = e / d

What are they and how do you determine these values?

1. “n” = how many students you have right now, hopefully, you already know this number.

2. “e” = the number of new students you gained over the past 12 months divided by 12 or simply your average number of monthly enrollments.

3. “d” = your drop-out rate which is calculated by taking “e” and dividing by “n” (e/n).

An Example to Illustrate

Imagine you are a studio that enrolls 15 students each month, and your drop-out rate is 8 percent. Let’s do the math:

n = 15 / 0.08

n = 187.5

This means that if nothing changes, your school will build to around 188 students and then will cease growing beyond that point.

Using the Numbers to Grow Your Business

What is more important is how you can use this to grow your school further. For example, what if you improved your enrollments to 18 students each month?

n = 18 / 0.08

n = 225

Simply by increasing your monthly enrollments by three, you have set yourself up to become a 225-student school. Now what if you took steps to keep your students happier and in your school longer to decrease your drop-out rate to 7 percent?

n = 18 / 0.07

n = 257

Now you will have become a 257-student school through a few very small tweaks to your business metrics.

The point is that by making little improvements, you can propel growth tremendously. Try applying this formula to your studio. See what sort of effect improving either of the variables will have. You will be surprised at what a big difference they make.

Take steps specifically to improve those variables in your school. Everything that you do should be focused on either increasing the number of monthly enrollments or preventing current students from dropping out.

There are many fantastic ideas in the Member Solutions article library that you should consult. If you have any questions, feel free to send me an email at sifu@wushucentral.com.


About the author: Sifu David Chang and his wife Elizabeth Chang are the owners of Wushu Central Martial Arts Academy with two locations in California. Sifu Chang is a former Wushu style forms national champion and Elizabeth is the brains behind the business. Each location enrolls an average of 25 students each month with a drop-out rate of 5 percent.

Success in Your Business: Creating a Sense of Belonging & Purpose

I am a big advocate of encouraging others to get creative with their ideas. In fact, about a year ago, I opened Fitness Compound, which offers a variety of fitness classes, programs, and training options including Zumba, cardio, Pilates, spinning, baseball, climbing, and basketball. Since then, I’ve added Mixed Martial Arts for kids, Zumba Tone, and Krav Maga to the mix.

Even though I’m offering services beyond traditional martial arts, I’m still creating the very same sense of community, purpose, and goal-driven environment as all other fitness-related businesses.

It’s critically important for your members (and prospective members) to get a sense of belonging and have a purpose when being a part of your gym or school. People want to be a part of something and feel good about themselves. Therefore, all your enrollment and retention efforts should include ways to fulfill those primary needs.

For instance, don’t shy away from holding free events. Many think that when they hold an event, they should charge a fee. They think their objective should be to make a certain amount of money on ticket sales. This shouldn’t be your main objective at all.

Your main objective when holding most events should be to create a sense of community and commonality to build rapport with your prospects. Hold a fundraiser for a worthy cause or a special springtime or summertime event to fuel business activity and to bring families and friends together. You will, in turn, build a business that people will want to be a part of and a contact list of prospects.

To strengthen retention, keep your members focused on achieving a goal. For instance, we hold a special internal campaign during the summer called 12 weeks of Summer, 36 Workouts. Anyone can sign up for the campaign. If they reach the goal of checking in at the gym for 36 workouts during the summer (three workouts a week), they get a T-shirt that says “I stayed in shape all summer at <Place of Business>.” You wouldn’t believe how this motivates members to stick to their fitness goals and get to the gym.

Remember the integral wishes of each and every human being: the need to belong and the need to feel good. When you keep these two intrinsic human needs in mind, and better yet, fulfill them through your business services, you’re well on your way to optimal success.

How have you created a sense of belonging and member community within your business? Share below.


About the author: Chuck Heacock is the owner of the Fitness Compound, a training facility that provides unparalleled fitness activities including Martial Arts classes, special boot camps, personal training, baseball, basketball, spinning, Zumba, cardio and more. Chuck is also a sought-after fitness industry consultant.

How to Increase Your Gross Sales Now

Membership management software sales dashboard

The 27th of March was a good news day for me. One of my General Managers called to inform me that my two Krav Maga schools were ranked #1 and #2 in the Member Solutions President’s Club based on total monthly gross billing totals. While I charge all of my enrollment fees, first month’s dues, and retail through a POS system, my two Krav Maga schools had still managed to climb the Member Solutions President’s Club rankings.

The Entrepreneur’s Club

I respect every instructor, owner, and manager on this list. The moxie it takes to believe you can make a healthy living teaching martial arts is substantial to put it mildly. Everyone on the list has undoubtedly faced obstacles and taken risks, and each of these people has overcome. That’s special.

I still remember the day I decided to sign what seemed to me to be (at the time) an expensive lease in the heart of Houston. I had somehow talked my way through two interviews with the property manager and minority investor of a newly-developed retail property. Terms were agreed upon. I was elated.

The first student I told was a private training client—a family member of a very wealthy and well-to-do Houston dynasty of sorts. I recall vividly what he said. “Don’t do it. You’ll never make it work.”

Thank God I didn’t buckle. In fact, the lease was signed the day the Dow dropped 777+ points. My commercial broker was sitting across from me on a family room chair. The lease lay still on my coffee table. He looked at the television, tuned to CNBC with the Dow in a free-fall. He looked at me and drew a long breath. “You don’t have to do this.”

“Yes, I do.” I replied. I suppose the rest is history. But it’s a history full of my share of close calls and decision points that have obviously propelled my businesses forward. Interestingly, my two schools are vastly different. The first school I opened with my life savings is a mere 2,900 square feet. It’s ranked #2 on the Member Solutions list and grossed more than $100,000 last month. My other school is the largest and largest contiguous Krav Maga school on the planet—boasting over 36,000 square feet of mats, heavy bags, CrossFit equipment, Hammer Strength equipment, and staff offices. This school had considerably more gross revenue than my smaller school, but as you might guess, the cost footprint is higher.

I’m sharing these things for a singular purpose—to reinforce the notion that any school of any size can be a huge success. You can be a huge success.

Optimizing Existing Sales Assets

A friend in the martial arts business called me a few weeks ago. His school was in a slump. The numbers were down across the board. He started by telling me what his new branding and marketing concepts were. I listened.

As I’m familiar with the school, I could speak with some level of understanding. In the end, he asked me for advice. I simply told him that I knew he had a quality program with top-shelf instructors, but I wondered if his sales staff were as accomplished (they are not).

In an ideal world, he’d convert every appointment. To that end, if he increased his closing ratio to 100 percent (for example and to make a point), he’d have to generate one-half the traffic to generate the same amount of monthly revenue—assuming he is converting 50 percent of his leads today. At the very least, he could dramatically increase enrollments and gross cash flow by simply closing at a higher, better rate. That’s job number one.

Job number two is to better work with existing members and new members (during “post close”) to generate more “warm” referral leads.

In summary, if my friend upgraded his sales training and process, he’d likely increase his closing rates by 30 percent while simultaneously increasing his lead stream by 50 percent or more (without ever spending an additional dime on marketing schemes), nearly doubling his revenue.

Prioritize and Preach Your Value Proposition

I earned my MBA in 1997 while working full time. I do have some background that makes the decision process a bit more structured for me. But, the one thing I know more than any other is this: everyone needs a world-class sales presentation and closing process. This is partly a sales training issue and partly a buy-in issue.

Put simply: If you don’t believe what you’re selling is valuable and life changing, no one else will. They certainly won’t pay for it.

The bottom line is your sales staff (this may mean you) must clearly understand the benefits of your martial arts programming and project a level of certainty and excitement about what your program can do for people (vision). This is a value proposition. Do you know yours?

The benefits of a martial arts program vary widely—from traditional martial arts to MMA and fighting, to self-defense programs like Krav Maga. Clearly identify the benefits you offer, and provide a wealth of evidence to back-up your claim.

Far too often, sales people present the view (what you see in the school on tour), not the vision (the short- and long-term benefits of martial arts training). It’s the vision that creates the value for your students. Only after clearly providing a superior value proposition can anyone really ask for the sale with confidence.

Using our sales program, we close just over 80 percent of all in-person leads at my small school with monthly fees ranging from $169–$219 and over 85 percent at my big school with monthly fees ranging from $99–$159. Every agreement has duration of 6–24 months. Absolutely no month-to-month contracts.

Do you want more sales? Implement a solid, well-conceived closing and post-closing sales process that clearly articulates your value proposition today.

Krav Maga Houston’s Chief Instructor, C.J. Kirk, is certified and licensed through the Krav Maga Association of America/Krav Maga Worldwide as a 3rd Dan Black Belt instructor. His two schools, Krav Maga Houston and Krav Maga Houston North, are the only certified and licensed schools in the Houston, TX area. Most recently, C.J. launched Kravology, an online resource for self-defense instructors and enthusiasts. For more Martial Arts and business information, register for the free Kravology weekly newsletter at kravology.com.

Help! What’s a Good Member Retention Rate for Fitness and Martial Arts Programs?

It’s difficult to suggest generic guidelines for retention. For one thing, your retention rate (or retention percentage) will surely vary between your programs. Martial Arts will tend to be stronger than general Fitness, and special programs such as Kickboxing or Boxing, can go either way.

I’ll give you a general answer, having worked with thousands of Martial Arts business clients throughout the past 25 years and managed their billing. An average “annual” monthly drop-out rate – one that you could use as a benchmark for your Martial Arts program – is about 20-30%. In other words, a 70-80% retention rate is typical.

When comparing your retention percentage to those of your peers, be aware that factors you cannot control, such as customer demographics, can influence your results. But, don’t focus on your peers. Your goal should always be to improve your retention no matter what it is. What you can control is your service delivery quality – you can make sure you are delivering what your members want. This will create the strongest member retention in your school.

I suggest determining your retention percentage for each of your programs. This will allow you to assess each program in your business and make changes where they’re needed most.

Before you get started, I want to make sure you have a consistent way to measure retention so you can track it. Then, you can set goals and make strategic changes in your business to attempt to influence your number upward.

Timing is Everything

To calculate retention, you first have to determine what timeframe you want to use. In the above example, I used one year. This variable is important and must be consistent for all future calculations.

Consider the retention rate on members the day after you sign them up; retention should be very close to 100%. However, after five years, retention may be very close to 0%. If your duration periods are not the same, you could be comparing apples and oranges.

What timeframe should you use? The most popular is 12 months but I like to use 18 months for Martial Arts and 12 months for Fitness. Whatever you decide, just keep your time period the same when comparing for the future.

How to Calculate Retention

Take your timeframe – let’s use 12 months – and count how many new members you enrolled 12 months ago. If you signed 10 new members and seven are still attending today (12 months later), your retention is 70%. It’s important to use attending versus paying members in your calculation. Members who are paying but not attending are still lost members.

Example:
New Martial Arts Members Signed 12 Months Ago: 10
Martial Arts Members Active This Month: 7
7 Active Members ÷ 10 New Members = 70% Retention for Your Martial Arts Program

Tracking Retention to Improve Your Business

This is only a one-month retention analysis. To acquire a more accurate retention value for your programs, you will want to have at least six months of data. If you keep good records (sales and attendance), you can go back and perform the same calculation for each of the past six months or longer. I recommend keeping an ongoing tally in a spreadsheet. Just remember, you are always comparing the active members you have this month against the sales you made 12 months ago.

Another benefit of maintaining a spreadsheet, you will also be able to monitor the time periods when you frequently lose members. If your retention average is 85% but the above example (70%) seems to occur every April, you can research why and implement a strategy. Let’s say the drop in retention is a result of students participating in other sports. Maybe you can implement an “Excel in Sports” program where you emphasize the benefits of Martial Arts training to athletes. You could also vary attendance requirements during the sports season to accommodate students’ schedules.

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Why Your Gym Needs a Mobile App

Hands holding mobile device with MemberAssist app

With all the other technology and marketing you invest in for your fitness business, you’re probably wondering, why does my gym need a mobile app? Let’s start with the facts:

Based on these statistics, most people spend way more time in mobile apps on their phones than they do in any gym. With your own mobile app, you’ll be able to interact and create a stronger bond with your members, helping you increase loyalty and retention.

How does a mobile app improve your members’ experience?

A mobile app helps you retain members by offering them a convenient way to interact with your business, improving communication and creating a more personal experience.

Convenience Is Key

To keep your members coming back, you need to try to make it as easy as possible for them to visit your facility and use your services. A mobile app makes it simple for members to browse and book classes or appointments at any time. Most people already use their phones for scheduling and like the convenience of viewing their gym schedule there, too.

A mobile app can also simplify front desk check in by letting members scan a barcode on their phones – which means they don’t need membership cards. These added conveniences show members that you understand their on the go lifestyles.

Keep Them in the Loop

Keep your members up-to-date on what’s happening at your facility so they feel valued and involved. Send news, special offers and event information via push notifications or in-app announcements. Be sure to update them on closures and cancellations with a quick message to their phones.

Let Them Explore

More than anything, a mobile app lets your members experience your fitness services in their own way. Through an app, they can discover new classes, share workouts with their friends on social media, or check out an event they might like. By providing this tool, you’re inviting them to expand their relationship with your business in whatever way they choose.

A mobile app is a great way to provide a superior experience for your members that increases loyalty and keeps your members coming back for more.

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